Thesis: vs curly hair, would impede doctors from

Thesis: Consumers should not be required to consult medical professionals for all genetic testing, but should have the access to genetic counselling and other sources of professional medical assistance. Requiring professional medical assistance for genetic testing would divert medical resources unnecessarily and raise healthcare pricing for consumers of genetic testing. Consumers should not be required to consult medical professionals for all genetic testing, but should have the access to genetic counselling and other sources of professional medical assistance. Requiring professional medical assistance for genetic testing would divert medical resources unnecessarily and raise healthcare pricing for consumers of genetic testing.There are already many issues with lost productivity and other costs in the modern healthcare system. According to the Qualcomm Foundation, each visit to a doctor’s office produces $43 worth of lost productivity, on average. In addition, patients spent an average of 121 minutes per visit, and paid an average of $32 per visit (Qualcomm Foundation). Yet, despite all these costs and other efforts intended to streamline the process, 1 out of every 20 adults in the United States is affected by some form of diagnostic error (Qualcomm Foundation). The healthcare system already has many efficiency problems. To require consumers to consult genetic / medicinal professionals will result in even costlier visits, both for healthcare professionals and consumers. Furthermore, to require the involvement of medical for the testing of harmless traits, such as straight vs curly hair, would impede doctors from treating other, potentially more serious ailments.However, although genetic counselling or other professional medical assistance need not be required, it should definitely be available for consumers who wish to consult genetic counselors. For example, a consumer may wish to test his/her chances of developing or having Huntington’s disease, a terminal, degenerative brain disease. Given that symptoms of the disease begin around midlife for most Huntington’s disease patients, having the disease, and learning of it early in life, would have huge implications for the future of the consumer. Many Huntington’s disease patients, as well patients of other terminal genetic diseases, have to consider whether they want to have children (as they could risk passing on the disease, especially an autosomal dominant disease like Huntington’s disease), whether they may want to be euthanized later in life, and other difficult decisions. Patients with terminal and/or life-threatening conditions certainly deserve the right to consult medical professionals to help make these difficult decisions and choose what is best for themselves. Overall, consumers should not have to seek professional help for genetic testing. However, genetic counselling and other medical assistance should be available for any who wish to utilize them.